Generations of Women’s History at AHA 2014

The AHA has come and gone for another year, and as I recover from the inevitable post-holidays/post-travel/post-conference flu, I’ve been catching up on some of the sessions I missed. Over on Prof. Hacker, Jennifer Guiliano posted a great recap of digital history offerings at the conference, asking readers to think critically about the frequent slippage between digital history and public history. It’s worth a read. [link]

This year, for the first time, I was able to attend the Coordinating Council for Women in History Friday night reception as well as the Saturday awards luncheon, where Crystal N. Feimster blew us all away with her talk, “‘The (Civil) War on Women’: A Case for Women’s History.” I went home and renewed my CCWH membership right away; 2014 marks its 45th anniversary year:

CCWH luncheon tweets

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If it’s November, it’s Conference Season

NWSA WoCLP

Photo by Meghan McInnis.

It’s November, which means conference season is up and running! I had a great time in CIncinnati for my first National Women’s Studies Association annual meeting, where I took part in the Women of Color Leadership Project. That’s us above, ready to get to work on Day 1.

There’s always more work to do, so this weekend I’m off to the American Studies Association in DC, where I’ll be giving a lightning talk tomorrow morning as part of the Digital Humanities Caucus event “Digital Shorts: New Platforms of Knowledge and Dissent.” Follow along on Twitter: #2013ASA.

Of course, what would the weekend before Thanksgiving be without AAR? Luckily it’s in Baltimore this year, giving me the opportunity to conference-hop and catch up with American religion friends. There’s a hashtag for everything: #AARSBL.

Women’s History in a Digital World

Last month I took part in the inaugural Women’s History in the Digital World (#WHDigWrld) conference of The Albert M. Greenfield Digital Center for the History of Women’s Education at Bryn Mawr College.

My paper, On Equal Terms? The Stakes of Archiving Women’s and LGBT History in the Digital Era, and many others have been archived in the Greenfield Digital Center repository and can be viewed online here. I’m looking forward to revisiting the many of the talks:

Michelle Moravec created a Storify to archive conference tweets and reflected on our weekend at her blog, History in the City.

For more on the conference, see Arden Kirkland’s post Women’s History, and…Metadata?!